Bcbg Outlet Open house at an alpaca farm t

Open house at an alpaca farm this weekend

this Saturday and Sunday (April 12 and 13) at Windy Farm Alpacas, a farm in Chesterfield in northern Burlington County, near Trenton, according to one of the owners, Jackie Armiger.

Although Chesterfield is farther away from Courier News and Home News Tribune territory than the alpaca farms in Hillsborough and Hunterdon County, Windy Farm Alpacas may be familiar to many of you from the annual Garden State Sheep and Fiber Festival in September, which is held on the Hunterdon County 4H Fairgrounds in Ringoes (East Amwell). Every year, the farm has a booth with yarn and other alpaca products, including fleece. The farm has 36 alpacas, and they been in business since 1999.

It shouldn be that difficult to find Windy Farm Alpacas because they just 3 miles from the NJ Turnpike, Exit 7, at 61 White Pine Road in Chesterfield. This is the second open house weekend (last weekend was the first one) and it will happen rain or shine. You be able to me Bcbg Outlet et the alpacas, as well as buy fleeces, ready made hats, gloves, rugs and toys, and (of course) YA Bcbg Outlet RN. Also, th Bcbg Outlet ere will be spinning demonstrations.

Readers who Bcbg Outlet live closer to Chesterfield might want to know that the farm also offers knitting and spinning classes.

I never been to Windy Farm Alpacas, but I been to other alpaca farms. The visits are always fun and I sure if you go, you (and your kids, if you have any) will have a wonderful time. I seriously considering going on Sunday. Maybe I see you there.

About Pam MacKenzie

Pam MacKenzie grew up in a real estate family. Her parents were real estate brokers and office managers, and she herself was a licensed agent in the 1970s. But early on, Pam discovered she’d much rather write about the industry than sell. Now in her eighth year as the real estate editor at the Courier News, Pam believes she has the best job at the paper. In this blog, she’s on a mission to empower readers to give them a strong understanding of anything and everything that can impact their ability to own a home. And she believes passionately that when you understand the real estate industry in New Jersey, you understand so much more: the education system, economic and racial bias, the way politics works or doesn’t work and ecology, to name a few. She invites everybody to leave lots of comments, even when they disagree with her. Pam learned to knit at age 6, when her friend’s mother made Pam’s doll a dress, and Pam wanted to make more. Her mother wanted her to learn how to sew in high school, but she was afraid of the sewing machines, cutting fabric the wrong way, and the potential that sewing would have for bringing down her grade point average. Every year, she managed to find a course conflict to avoid sewing classes. But the day after high school graduation, she took her graduation money to a fabric store, bought a kit to make a sweater, taught herself to read patterns and never looked back. These days, she knits a prayer shawl every month, along with sweaters, tote bags, gift bags and other goodies. She also designs many of her projects. Read More About Pam

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The Knitting HereticRecent CommentsErin McDonald: I do love knitting shawls and will look further into the contents and patterns in this book. Thanks.

Janice: Thank you for this insightful review. The perfect knitting for me now that I relocated to Texas. It.

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